Natadera

那谷寺は、九谷焼の陶石が取れる白山の麓に位置する石川県小松市の仏教寺院。広い境内は奇岩遊仙境と称され、紅葉狩りの名所でもある。岩窟内に造られた本殿など5つの重要文化財と2箇所の名勝がある。本展は、特別拝観エリアに位置する『書院』と言われる江戸時代初期の書院建築の姿を現在に伝える貴重な建造物の中と、庭園に位置する茶室『如是庵』の中において展示が行われる。

Oki Junko

Moon and chrysalis 03, 2017
Cotton, hemp, bandage, iron, beeswax
H120.3×W91×D2.8 cm
Courtesy of KOSAKU KANECHIKA

Sense and sweetness 06, 2018
Silk, linen, cotton, iron, beeswax
H158×W25.5×D23 cm
Courtesy of KOSAKU KANECHIKA

Sense and sweetness 03, 2018
Silk, cotton, wool, straw mat, wooden box, nail, acrylic resin
H130×W44.3×D10.3 cm
Courtesy of KOSAKU KANECHIKA

Installation view: anthology, 2020
Hagi Uragami Museum
Photo: ICHIKAWA Yasushi

Oki’s textile works are embroidered into existence. Stitch by stitch, they take shape under her needle. The process requires overwhelming amounts of concentration. Oki’s embroidery threads manipulate the cloth, sometimes creating bulged surfaces or three-dimensional works of fabric sculpture—an embroidery process that results in the creation of space. Oki’s vivid colors, decorative patterns, and unwavering concentration create an enchanting world. Her works are steeped in lyricism.

Born in 1963 in Urawa, Saitama Prefecture, Oki graduated from the Setsu Mode Seminar art school. She uses fine sewing threads to create unique and delicate designs. Her works are exhibited around the world. In 2017, she received the 11th Shiseido Art Egg award (Tokyo). Her art is included in the permanent collection of the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa.

Kojiro Yoshiaki

Installation view: Yoshiaki KOJIRO|Yasuhiro SUMII, 2019
Seto Ceramics and Glass Art Center, Aichi, Japan

Installation view: Yoshiaki KOJIRO|Yasuhiro SUMII, 2019
Seto Ceramics and Glass Art Center, Aichi, Japan

Installation view: Yoshiaki KOJIRO|Yasuhiro SUMII, 2019
Seto Ceramics and Glass Art Center, Aichi, Japan

Structural Blue, 2015
Glass, copper oxide powder
Kiln foam casting
H40×W130×D220 cm

Structural Blue 30R.1, 2019
Glass, copper oxide powder
Kiln foam casting
H24×W31×D31 cm

Structural Blue 45.1, 2015
Glass, copper oxide powder
Kiln foam casting

Kojiro’s works are based on geometric shapes such as domes and cubes rendered in subdued whites and blues. His works consist of forms created by the chemical reactions of glass—a subject that reflects his interest in structure and mechanics. As such, Kojiro does not directly shape or color his pieces. Rather, the tone and form of his works are determined by the chemical reactions of his chosen materials. This process underpins the intrigue of his work and his characteristically minimalist approach.

Born in 1968, Kojiro holds an ME from the Tokyo University of Science Graduate School of Science and Engineering. He is a graduate of the Kanazawa Utatsuyama Crafts Workshop. Kojiro received the Grand Prize at the 2004 International Exhibition of Glass Kanazawa and special mention at the 2017 Loewe Foundation Craft Prize (Madrid). His works are included in the permanent collections of numerous museums, including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Sasaki Rui

Installation view: Nyctophilia -Light in the Absence of it, 2019
Glasmuseet Ebeltoft, Denmark

Liquid Sunshine, 2016
Glass, glass with phosphorescent crystal mixture, solarium light, motion detector
Glassblowing

Weather Mirror, 2020
Glass, glass with phosphorescent crystal mixture, Mirror
Glassblowing, Fusing
Φ49.5×D4 cm

Liquid Sunshine /Soranimitsurouka, 2020
Glass, glass with phosphorescent crystal mixture, light, lighting controller
Glassblowing, coldworking

Liquid Sunshine (detail), 2016
Glass, glass with phosphorescent crystal mixture, solarium light, motion detector
Glassblowing

Sasaki says glass is a container for preserving memories. For her, it is a medium for expression and nothing more. Of course, her works are not containers in the sense of the everyday glass vessels that populate our lives, and as works of art, they enjoy a freedom of form. From clippings of plants sealed between sheets of fused glass for Subtle Intimacy to the light captured by works of phosphorescent glass, Sasaki’s art traps many things that awaken memories within the viewer.

Born in 1984 in Kochi Prefecture, Sasaki currently lives in Ishikawa Prefecture. In 2010, she completed her MFA in glass at the Rhode Island School of Design. In 2019, Sasaki was commissioned to create an installation for the Corning Museum of Glass. In 2021, she participated in exhibitions held at the Toyama Glass Art Museum and the Latvian National Museum of Art.

Sawada Shinichi

Untitled Ceramic 2007 H33×W17×D12 cm

Untitled Ceramic 2007 H34×W16×D13 cm

Untitled Ceramic 2007 H39×W11×D11 cm

Untitled Ceramic

Untitled Ceramic

Untitled Ceramic

Sawada creates symbolic ceramic objects that resemble people or imaginary creatures. Their forms are bizarre yet humorous. The countless thorny spikes covering his creations may be interpreted as receptors for sensing the world or as protective fur. While Sawada’s early works were small, animal-like objects that fit in the palm of one’s hand, his pieces have grown larger over time, becoming great, spike-covered sculptures resembling humans or animals. His human forms are always depicted upright. Sawada’s style continues to evolve; his newest works are covered in fewer thorns.

Born in 1982 in Shiga Prefecture. Sawada is based in Ritto (Shiga Prefecture), where he makes ceramics while attending Nakayoshi Fukushikai, a social welfare organization for individuals with disabilities. In 2008, he was awarded the Shiga Prefecture Cultural Achievement Award. His works have been shown at the 55th Venice Biennale and other exhibitions around the world.

Tanaka Nobuyuki

Inner side - Outer side, 2005
Lacquer, hemp cloth
kanshitsu (dry lacquer) technique
H220×W158×D85 cm
Installation view: Silent Echoes: Collection Exhibition II, 2011
21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art , Kanazawa

Primordial Memory, 2017
Lacquer, hemp cloth
kanshitsu (dry lacquer) technique
H215×W300×D27 cm
Installation view: Oku Noto Triennale, 2017

Imaginary Skin I, 2016
Lacquer, hemp cloth
kanshitsu (dry lacquer) technique
H212×W130×D60 cm

Left: Tactile Memory, 2003
Lacquer, hemp cloth
kanshitsu (dry lacquer) technique
H173×W76×D2 cm

Right: No title, 2003
Lacquer, aluminum
Roiro finish
H176.3×W72×D0.4 cm

Tanaka belongs to the first generation of artists to use lacquer as a central technique for large-scale sculpture art. His art utilizes the enigmatic texture of lacquer to create beautiful surfaces. The unique curves that characterize his work are the result of Tanaka’s pursuit of formal ideals. While Tanaka’s works are stand-alone pieces that can be exhibited anywhere, the qualities of their lacquer surfaces create an interactive relationship with surrounding spaces, lending them the qualities of site-specific art.

Tanaka received his MFA from the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music in 1985. A pioneer of lacquer art, he is the recipient of the 18th MOA Mokichi Okada Award Grand Prize. His works are included in the permanent collections of museums around the world, including the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo and the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York). Tanaka is a professor at the Kanazawa College of Art.